I highly recommend the following article…

THE CURRENT STATE OF ACCESS TO BASIC EDUCATION FOR SYRIAN REFUGEE CHILDREN LIVING IN THE ZA’ATARI CAMP       written by Theresa L. Frey

Theresa Frey has based her research around the following 3 questions..

  1. Who is accessing Education in Zaatari?
  2. How are certain groups accessing Education?
  3. What is the Learning Environment Of Zaatari?

A summary of her findings follow….

Who is accessing Education in Zaatari?

  • The United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) (2015) predicts that Syrian children are accessing education at the lowest rate of enrollment in the world.
  • Save the Children (2015) estimates that half the children involved in the Syrian crisis are not receiving any form of education, formal or informal.

 

How are certain groups accessing Education?

  • Currently, the girls are going to school in the morning between 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., and the boys between 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. This schedule follows a double shift system, where classes are taught in 35 minutes, as opposed to the 45 minutes classes in a typical school in Jordan.

 

What is the Learning Environment of Zaatari?

  • There has been a change from a need for personal learning supplies , to supplies for the classroom, e.g.: whiteboards, libraries.
  • Classes have been reduced to fewer than 50 students in most cases (UNICEF, JENA, 2013; CCFA, 2015).
  • Reports indicate that in addition to classrooms being too crowded, noise levels have been reported to be so loud that it was difficult for students learn (UNICEF, JENA, 2014).
  • Nutrition is also lacking for students in Za’atari, as very few students eat three meals a day.
  • There are no breaks scheduled, and students across all ages said it was extremely difficult to stay focused without breaks (UNICEF, JENA 2013; UNICEF, JENA, 2014).
  • Violence is also an on-going issue affecting school in Za’atari, as children have reported that the teachers are verbally abusive (UNICEF, JENA, 2013).
  • Teachers have also reported very serious concerns with the psychosocial health of their students (UNICEF, JENA, 2013).
  • Many teachers have expressed the need for psychosocial support, and for training that builds skills of classroom management and support the Syrian refugee students (UNICEF, JENA, 2013).
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